Smart Girl Stories

Female Nobel Prize Laureates

Learn about the inspiring female Nobel prize laureates. Between the years 1901 and 2021, only 59 women have been awarded a Nobel Prize. Here are the 59 women that have received a prize (or two). Marie Curie was awarded two prizes in 1903 and again in 1911 for Chemistry and Physics achievements. She is the only woman in history to be awarded two prizes and she was the first woman to receive a prize.

Chemistry:

Emmanuelle Charpentier for “the development of a method for genome editing” (2020)

Jennifer A. Doudna for “the development of a method for genome editing” (2020)

Frances H. Arnold for “the directed evolution of enzymes” (2018)

Ada E. Yonath for “studies of the structure and function of the ribosome” (2009)

Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin for “her determinations by X-ray techniques of the structures of important biochemical substances” (1964)

Irène Joliot-Curie “in recognition of their synthesis of new radioactive elements”

Physiology or Medicine:

Tu Youyou for “her discoveries concerning a novel therapy against Malaria” (2015)

May-Britt Mouser for “their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain” (2014)

Elizabeth H. Blackburn for “the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase” (2009)

Carol W. Greider for “the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase” (2009)

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi for “their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus” (2008)

Linda B. Buck for “their discoveries of odorant receptors and the organisation of the olfactory system” (2004)

Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard for “their discoveries concerning the genetic control of early embryonic development” (1995)

Gertrude B. Elion for “their discoveries of important principles for drug treatment” (1988)

Rita Levi-Montalcini for “their discoveries of growth factors” (1986)

Barbara McClintock for “her discovery of mobile genetic elements” (1983)

Rosalyn Yalow for “the development of radioimmunoassays of peptide hormones” (1977)

Gerty Cori for “their discovery of the course of the catalytic conversion of glycogen” (1947)

Literature:

Louise Glück for “her unmistakable poetic voice that with austere beauty makes individual existence universal” (2020)

Olga Tokarczuk for “a narrative imagination that with encyclopedic passion represents the crossing of boundaries as a form of life” (2018)

Svetlana Alexievich for “her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time” (2015)

Alice Munro as she is a “master of the contemporary short story” (2013)

Herta Müller “who, with the concentration of poetry and frankness of prose, depicts the landscape of the dispossessed” (2009)

Doris Lessing “that epicist of the femal experience, who with scepticism, fire and visionary power has subjected a divided civilisation to scrutiny” (2007)

Elfriede Jelinek for “her musical flow of voices and counter-voices in novels and plays that with extraordinary linguistic zeal reveal the absurdity of society’s clichés and their subjugating power” (2004)

Wislawa Szymborska for “poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality” (1996)

Toni Morrison “who in novels characterized by visionary force at poetic import, gives to an essential aspect of American reality” (1993).

Nadine Gordimer “who through her magnificent epic writing has – in the words of Alfred Nobel – been of very great benefit to humanity” (1991)

Nelly Sachs for “her outstanding lyrical and dramatic writing, which interprets Israel’s destiny with touching strength” (1966)

Gabriela Mistral for “her lyric poetry which, inspired by powerful emotions, has made her name a symbol of the idealistic aspirations of the entire Latin American world” (1945)

Pearl Buck for “her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces” (1938)

Sigrid Undset for “her powerful descriptions of Northern life during the Middle Ages” (1928)

Grazia Deledda for “her idealistically inspired writings which with plastic clarity picture the life on her native island and with depth and sympathy deal with human problems in general” (1926)

Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf “in appreciation of the lofty idealism, vivid imagination and spiritual perception that characterize her writings” (1909)

Peace:

Maria Ressa for “their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace” (2021)

Nadia Murad for “their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict” (2018)

Malala Yousafzai for “their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education” (2014)

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf for “their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work” (2011)

Leymah Gbowee for “their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work” (2011)

Tawakkol Karman for “”their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work” (2011)

Wangari Muta Maathai for “her contribution to sustainable development, democracy, and peace” (2004)

Shirin Ebadi for “her efforts for democracy and human rights. She has focused especially on the struggle for the rights of women and children” (2003)

Jody Williams for “their work for the banning and clearing of anti-personnel mines” (1997)

Rigoberta Menchú Tum “in recognition of her work for social justice and ethno-cultural reconciliation based on respect for the rights of indigenous peoples” (1992)

Aung San Suu Kyi for “her non-violent struggle for democracy and human-rights” (1991)

Alva Myrdal for “their work for disarmament and nuclear and weapon-free zones” (1982)

Mother Teresa for “her work for bringing help to suffering humanity” (1979)

Betty Williams for “the courageous efforts in founding a movement to put an end to the violent conflict in Northern Ireland” (1976)

Mairead Corrigan for “the courageous efforts in founding a movement to put an end to the violent conflict in Northern Ireland” (1976)

Emily Greene Balch for “her lifelong work for the cause of peace” (1946)

Jane Addams for “their assiduous effort to revive the ideal of peace and to rekindle the spirit of peace in their own nation and in the whole of mankind” (1931)

Baroness Bertha Sophie Felicita von Suttner for “her audacity to oppose the horrors of war” (1905)

Economic Sciences:

Elinor Ostrom for “her analysis of economic governance, especially the commons” (2009)

Esther Duflo for “their experimental approach to alleviating global poverty” (2019)

Physics:

Andrea Ghez for “the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the centre of our galaxy” (2020)

Donna Strickland for “groundbreaking inventions in the field of laser physics” and for “their method of generating high-intensity, ultra-short optical pulses” (2018)

Maria Goeppert Mayer for “their discoveries concerning nuclear shell structure” (1963)

Hannah

Hannah

Founder, Smart Girl, Survivor, Champion of womens rights and kids rights

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